Richard & Stacy's Round the World Trip 2001

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The Australian Exhibits
The Bird and Reptile Exhibits
The African Exhibits

The pathway of the Australian exhibit emptied out into an area near an aviary.

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A little moochy bird. Woodfinch?   A pair of black faced parrots.
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The butt end of an ocampa on the floor of an aviary cage.   Above the ocampa is a blue macaw.
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Next cage over is a scarlet macaw - he was having a screeching competition with the blue macaw next door.   An Australian razorbill - shouldn't this have been on the Australian exhibits page?

Beside the aviaries were the reptile exhibits. All kinds of reptiles, starting with the largest in the world, the komodo dragon...

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A single komodo dragon hanging out in the deep pit pen.    After a couple of big tongue slurps, the komodo started looking for zoo patrons to eat...

Across the path from the komodo dragon were a particular kind of alligator, although not called alligator. There are apparently four species along these lines, alligators, crocodiles, caymans and this one, who's name escapes us all.

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This particular reptile which is not an alligator is a fish hunter.   You can see the very narrow snout and interlocking teeth that make it effective for catching slimy things.
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In the indoor pavilion were a couple of oddball non-reptiles, like this lungfish.   There was also a Japanese Giant Salamander - about five feet long!
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There were a couple of kinds of turtles, tortoises really, like these extended tortoises.   And down the hall a bit, these are star shell tortoises, named for fairly obvious reasons.

But these were the exceptions to the exhibit, that vast majority of the creatures inside were reptiles, like lizards:

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A sailback lizard keeps a close watch on the visitors from behind glass.   In the same pen, you can see why these lizards are called "sailbacks."
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A gila monster, one of only two poisonous lizards in the world.   And this is a green lizard... wonder where it gets that name from.
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There were a couple of species of iguana, including these Fijian iguanas.   And nearby a common green iguana soaked up the noon day sun.
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This is a hooded lizard, so called because the skin around its neck can be expanded to create a kind of hood.   The name of these lizards escaped, but aren't they cute?

And... SNAKES!

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A reticulated python, which can grow to be more than 20 feet long...   A taipan, in the top five most poisonous snakes in the world.
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An Egyptian cobra, who is unfortunately relaxed, so we don't get to see its cool hood.   Something from home - a western rattlesnake, curled up under a warm rock.
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The rhinoceros python, so called because of the horn-like extensions coming from its nose.   An amethyst python - unfortunately the camera didn't capture the scintillation of the scales that gives this snake its name.
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The fierce snake - appropriately named, unlike the other snakes we saw, this one was racing around its cage, rather... fiercely.   The brown snake, another super-lethal snake, one bite transmits enough venom to kill 200,000 mice.

The reptile exhibit was very large, there are a number of pictures that didn't make it into this page. Apparently Australia has 11 of the 15 most poisonous snakes in the world. What's up with that? 

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